It’s not often I feel compelled to write about things I watch and especially not specific episodes. But this happened.

My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic aired an episode that is basically all about how Rainbow Dash has ADHD. I don’t know if that was the specific intent of the writers, to write Rainbow Dash as having ADHD, but to anybody who has or knows someone who has ADHD I think that’s what we’re going to see.

I wish they’d had more things like this on television when I was a kid. Rainbow Dash in this episode was me throughout school. The moment she started rocking side to side in the chair I started snowballing down “I Can Relate to This” Mountain. 

I don’t remember seeing very many accurate portrayals of ADHD on television. ADHD characters tended to be portrayed in a way that showed a serious lack of understanding of what ADHD is. The focus was either entirely on the hyperactivity or the attention deficit part was shown as the character having an attention span of about two seconds (“So, when we divide the x from a and multiply it by - hey look! Shiny thing! As I was saying, the square root of pi is - is that a balloon?”). They were usually disruptive, loud, over impulsive, and often kind of confused. Always looked over was the part where ADHD kids are often pretty smart, that they often can pay attention to several things at once, and might see details that other people don’t.  

I didn’t have a lot of characters on television that I could relate to, who were like me when I was growing up. Interpreting Rainbow Dash as having ADHD gives us two current, relatively realistic and positive portrayals of ADHD characters, Stiles in Teen Wolf being the other. There may be others too but I don’t watch a lot of television anymore and I haven’t seen any who’ve stood out to me. 

The episode also highlights how everyone has a different learning style, not just ADHD kids. Sure, a lot of kids learn just fine Twilight Sparkle’s way. That’s why it remains the standard way children are taught. That doesn’t mean everyone can learn like that. And it doesn’t mean the kids who can’t learn that way are stupid.

This episode needs to be required viewing for anyone getting an education degree. And maybe there should be a mass viewing of it on a professional development day. Kids shouldn’t need a cartoon to tell them they aren’t stupid. They wouldn’t need this in their cartoons if there weren’t teachers who make them feel stupid for not being able to learn the way everyone else does. It’s bad enough to hear it from the other kids, but when it’s coming from the teachers it’s really hard to feel like it isn’t true.

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instructables:

Fiber Optic Dress by Natalina

It looks like a jelly fish! I have decided that this dress qualifies as a need. It is not a want, it is something I need to have in my life.

(via shaggyshan)

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I don’t know what kind of weird wonderful April Fool’s joke I just became part of or if this is something I can trust… but whatever it is I have a top hat on my user icon now.

UPDATE:

It is no longer April Fool’s Day :( I miss the top hat.

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itswalky:

just when you think it can’t get any better suddenly it does

I didn’t know it until now, but I have been waiting my entire life for this.

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Something I wish people wouldn’t do:

People on the internet do this a lot. You do it when you find a really cool person on the interwebs or you find a really awesome music group or artist that you have never heard before or a really hilarious video that you have never seen yet. You leave a comment on this cool new thing to tell them who they can thank for your new found love of them.

A favorite YouTuber openly recommend a music video - you leave a comment on the music video saying “YouTuberXYZ sent me! Great music! Love you!”.

A celebrity on Twitter posts a video you have never seen before, be it viral or some cool short film, you leave a comment that “CelebrityPerson sent me! I love your video!”

Someone you follow on Tumblr posts a link to a favorite blog or site or Tumblr and you let that blog, site, or Tumblr know how you found them. 

Someone introduces you to the works of an author and if you ever meet that author at a signing you let them know how your friend is responsible for your love of the author.

You may read this and wonder what’s wrong with that. Why shouldn’t you give credit to the person who introduced you to these things? The problem isn’t about giving credit or thanks to someone who introduces you to something great. It’s about how it’s done.

If your favorite YouTuber posts a video about how amazing something is then leave a comment on their video thanking them for introducing you to this amazing thing. Then leave a comment for the amazing thing about how great and wonderful and amazing they are leaving out the part where you found them through someone else. YouTuber gets credit for having awesome taste, creator of the awesome thing gets credit for having created something awesome.

When you leave a comment on someone’s cool thing telling them how this person or that person lead you to find this you indirectly give credit for the things amazingness to the person who you found it through rather than the person who made it. You’re telling the creator that they’re amazing because YouTuberXYZ recommended them and not because they’re amazing on their own. You’re telling them that they have someone else to thank for any sudden increase in interest in their work. And while it may be partially true, it’s inappropriate to say. 

So, again, tell someone that you’re interested in their work because it’s interesting. Don’t tell them you’re interested in their work because somebody else told you it was interesting.

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I like the way Tumblr dresses up the logo for special days. As fun as the Google illustrations can be, sometimes a nice subtle piece of festivity is nicer.

That said, it appears to be Pi Day.

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I want to see how sick people are. Reblog if you have ever been bullied physically or mentally. Ever been called a name. Cried at night. Ever been cyber bullied. Just reblog if you have been bullied.

(Source: dancinq, via aka-andi)

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“You can find the game by searching Humpty Dumpty Wall Game”
-aka-andi

Awesome! I’m going to have to order one. I can’t believe I’ve never seen this game before.

I wonder if it could be adapted to be like classic Donkey Kong…

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Jonghyun’s odd punishment

Okay… guys… the relevant thing here isn’t me posting my K-pop obsession all over my blog. Ignore that part. The K-pop group is not relevant to your interests. They’re not there.

WHAT IS THIS GAME?!

It’s like some magical Humpty Dumpty Jenga. I want need this. What is it? Is it called something ridiculously simple like Humpty Dumpty or Jenga Jr.? Why have I never seen this before? I want a game where I get to make Humpty Dumpty fall! My life is incomplete without this.There’s now a hole in my soul. I must fill it with Humpty Dumpty Jenga.

(Source: segawangcoffee, via funnykpopstuff)

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ktshy:

The Sisterhood of the Dragon : a tale of lady knights and dragons

When a kingdom is born on the outskirts of the dragons’ domain, the king and his advisors began the ritual of sacrifice to appease the winged creatures. At the beginning and end of each year a girl would be sacrificed to the dragons.

But the dragons were horrified by such a brutal and barbaric offering; so they took the girls and brought them to their nesting grounds, giving the abandoned young women new homes and purpose - to guard the dragons’ eggs. So the Sisterhood of the Dragon was born; those betrayed by their kingdom were welcomed with open arms and wings - trained to fight and protect, some to heal and some to sew and some to cook and some to nurture and some to hunt, each woman finding purpose and her own calling.

Is this a thing?? I would like this to be a thing!!

This actually kinda is a thing. There’s a novel by Mercedes Lackey called One Good Knight from her Five Hundred Kingdoms series. It’s pretty good and also has some mythology tie ins.

(Source: girlsarewolves)

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dc9spot:

Beauty(?) and the Beast …genderbend XD!

This is absurdly cute. Beast is all fluff and adorable. If Beauty and the Beast were remade with a female Beast and a male Belle (though I guess he’d be called Beau or something)… I’d probably pay to see it in theaters more than once. Not just because this design is adorable but because it’d be refreshingly new and different from the way we usually see the story told. And if done by Disney… Beast as a Disney Princess? All fluffy and adorable but sometimes rage filled and sullen and broody? It’d be nice to see a Disney princess that wasn’t always a bright, positive little ball of sunshine. 

(via shaggyshan)

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Where do you think Van Gogh rates in the history of art?

This gif set brings back all the feels from watching the episode. This is one of the best Dr Who episodes ever. Period. I declare all other arguments invalid.

Also: truthiness. 

(Source: btyciane, via solidinjection)

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anotherfirebender:

m1ssred:

chemical reaction

*how to spawn demons: a beginner’s guide to chemistry

Is it weird that the word that comes to mind watching these gifs is “sexy”? Can anyone else imagine these demonstrations being done by a cute young science teacher? 

(via solidinjection)

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laengine:

dayoftheknight:

hetahomestuckgirl:

wynterwillow:

everythingaboutstacy:

durianseeds:


Canada’s rainbow money

Fun fact for Americans: our money is technically made of plastic and they won’t get wet/gross when you accidentally wash them, and you also can’t rip any bills.

Everybody is in love with canadian money, the thing is who isn’t? 

The funniest thing ever is to see canadians try to use american money. One of my friends asked me “HOW DO YOU GUYS KNOW WHICH ONE IS WHICH?! THEY’RE ALL THE SAME COLOR!”

its called reading the numbers

americans learn at an early age to differentiate between the faces of old white men

And all those maple leaves are scratch and sniff maple syrup.

This is something I’ve never noticed before and now that I’ve noticed it it’s bothering me.
Our rainbow money does not follow rainbow order.
In the picture all of the bills are arranged in color order but not in order of value. Why can’t my money rainbow also be properly ordered from highest to lowest dollar amount? Who chose the colors this way? 

laengine:

dayoftheknight:

hetahomestuckgirl:

wynterwillow:

everythingaboutstacy:

durianseeds:

Canada’s rainbow money

Fun fact for Americans: our money is technically made of plastic and they won’t get wet/gross when you accidentally wash them, and you also can’t rip any bills.

Everybody is in love with canadian money, the thing is who isn’t? 

The funniest thing ever is to see canadians try to use american money. One of my friends asked me “HOW DO YOU GUYS KNOW WHICH ONE IS WHICH?! THEY’RE ALL THE SAME COLOR!”

its called reading the numbers

americans learn at an early age to differentiate between the faces of old white men

And all those maple leaves are scratch and sniff maple syrup.

This is something I’ve never noticed before and now that I’ve noticed it it’s bothering me.

Our rainbow money does not follow rainbow order.

In the picture all of the bills are arranged in color order but not in order of value. Why can’t my money rainbow also be properly ordered from highest to lowest dollar amount? Who chose the colors this way? 

(Source: xweevee, via shaggyshan)

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faitherinhicks:

ink-splotch:

There comes a point where Susan, who was the older girl, is lost to Narnia because she becomes interested in lipstick. She’s become irreligious basically because she found sex. I have a big problem with that.” - JK Rowling

Can we talk about Susan’s fabulous adventures after Narnia? The ones where she wears nylons and elegant blouses when she wants to, and short skirts and bright lipstick when she wants to, and hiking boots and tough jeans and big men’s plaid shirts when she feels like backpacking out into the mountains and remembering what it was to be lost in a world full of terrific beauty— I know her siblings say she stops talking about it, that Susan walks away from the memories of Narnia, but I don’t think she ever really forgot.

I want to read about Susan finishing out boarding school as a grown queen reigning from a teenaged girl’s body. School bullies and peer pressure from children and teachers who treat you like you’re less than sentient wouldn’t have the same impact. C’mon, Susan of the Horn, Susan who bested the DLF at archery, and rode a lion, and won wars, sitting in a school uniform with her eyebrows rising higher and higher as some old goon at the front of the room slams his fist on the lectern. 

Susan living through WW2, huddling with her siblings, a young adult (again), a fighting queen and champion marksman kept from the action, until she finally storms out against screaming parents’ wishes and volunteers as a nurse on the front. She keeps a knife or two hidden under her clothes because when it comes down to it, they called her Gentle, but sometimes loving means fighting for what you care for. 

She’ll apply to a women’s college on the East Coast, because she fell in love with America when her parents took her there before the war. She goes in majoring in Literature (her ability to decipher High Diction in historical texts is uncanny), but checks out every book she can on history, philosophy, political science. She sneaks into the boys’ school across town and borrows their books too. She was once responsible for a kingdom, roads and taxes and widows and crops and war. She grew from child to woman with that mantle of duty wrapped around her shoulders. Now, tossed here on this mundane land, forever forbidden from her true kingdom, Susan finds that she can give up Narnia but she cannot give up that responsibility. She looks around and thinks I could do this better.

I want Susan sneaking out to drink at pubs with the girls, her friends giggling at the boys checking them out from across the way, until Susan walks over (with her nylons, with her lipstick, with her sovereignty written out in whatever language she damn well pleases) and beats them all at pool. Susan studying for tests and bemoaning Aristotle and trading a boy with freckles all over his nose shooting lessons so that he will teach her calculus. Susan kissing boys and writing home to Lucy and kissing girls and helping smuggle birth control to the ladies in her dorm because Susan Pevensie is a queen and she understands the right of a woman to rule over her own body. 

Susan losing them all to a train crash, Edmund and Peter and Lucy, Jill and Eustace, and Lucy and Lucy and Lucy, who Susan’s always felt the most responsible for. Because this is a girl who breathes responsibility, the little mother to her three siblings until a wardrobe whisked them away and she became High Queen to a whole land, ruled it for more than a decade, then came back centuries later as a legend. What it must do to you, to be a legend in the body of a young girl, to have that weight on your shoulders and have a lion tell you that you have to let it go. What is must do to you, to be left alone to decide whether to bury your family in separate ceremonies, or all at once, the same way they died, all at once and without you. What it must do to you, to stand there in black, with your nylons, and your lipstick, and feel responsible for these people who you will never be able to explain yourself to and who you can never save. 

Maybe she dreams sometimes they made it back to Narnia after all. Peter is a king again. Lucy walks with Aslan and all the dryads dance. Maybe Susan dreams that she went with them— the train jerks, a bright light, a roar calling you home. 

Maybe she doesn’t. 

Susan grows older and grows up. Sometimes she hears Lucy’s horrified voice in her head, “Nylons? Lipstick, Susan? Who wants to grow up?”  and Susan thinks, “Well you never did, Luce.” Susan finishes her degree, stays in America (England looks too much like Narnia, too much like her siblings, and too little, all at once). She starts writing for the local paper under the pseudonym Frank Tumnus, because she wants to write about politics and social policy and be listened to, because the name would have made Edmund laugh. 

She writes as Susan Pevensie, too, about nylons and lipstick, how to give a winning smiles and throw parties, because she knows there is a kind of power there and she respects it. She won wars with war sometimes, in Narnia, but sometimes she stopped them before they began.

Peter had always looked disapprovingly on the care with which Susan applied her makeup back home in England, called it vanity. And even then, Susan would smile at him, say “I use what weapons I have at hand,” and not explain any more than that. The boy ruled at her side for more than a decade. He should know better. 

Vain is not the proper word. This is about power. But maybe Peter wouldn’t have liked the word “ambition” any more than “vanity.”

Susan is a young woman in the 50s and 60s. Frank Tumnus has quite the following now. He’s written a few books, controversial, incendiary. Susan gets wrapped up in the civil rights movement, because of course she would. It’s not her first war. All the same, she almost misses the White Witch. Greed is a cleaner villain than senseless hate. She gets on the Freedom Rider bus, mails Mr. Tumnus articles back home whenever there’s a chance, those rare occasions they’re not locked up or immediately threatened. She is older now than she ever was in Narnia. Susan dreams about Telemarines killing fauns. 

Time rolls on. Maybe she falls in love with a young activist or an old cynic. Maybe she doesn’t. Maybe Frank Tumnus, controversial in the moment, brilliant in retrospect, gets offered an honorary title from a prestigious university. She declines and publishes an editorial revealing her identity. Her paper fires her. Three others mail her job offers. 

When Vietnam rolls around, she protests in the streets. Susan understands the costs of war. She has lived through not just the brutal wars of one life, but two. 

Maybe she has children now. Maybe she tells them stories about a magical place and a magical lion, the stories Lucy and Edmund brought home about how if you sail long enough you reach the place where the seas fall off the edge of the world. But maybe she tells them about Cinderella instead, Sleeping Beauty, Rapunzel, except Rapunzel cuts off her own hair and uses it to climb down the tower and escape. The damsel uses what tools she has at hand. 

A lion told her to walk away, and she did. He forbade her magic, he forbade her her own kingdom, so she made her own. 

Susan Pevensie did not lose faith. She found it. 

omg ;_;

Someone with more patience for writing and story making… please write this novel. I am not above begging. Don’t make me try this myself. It will come out unfinished and half coherent. This story deserves better than that.

(Source: ifallelseperished)

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